Theodore Taylor’s The Cay

erhaps Timothy is an alien learning our language and has finally fostered a friendship with Phillip that is worthy enough to refer to Phillip by his full name rather than young boss. The unwarranted emphasis on the pronunciation of “Philip” is probably what reminds you of E.T., yet this is not a relationship involving extraterrestrials. This is a relationship between a black man and a [bratty] white boy.

Thoughts on Stéphan Mallarmé

Reading this paired with the constant analogy of music that Mallarmé uses, I found myself remembering a quote that I have come across numerous times. Imagine yourself as a teenager again: After an argument with your parents about whether you could go out on Saturday night, you storm into your room and find solace with your computer. You blast “We’re Not Gonna Take It” and vow that you are not gonna take it anymore. You open up AIM and enter your new away message, “Where words leave off, music begins,” which was probably the same away message as half of your contacts. This overly cliché saying seems to be extremely similar to Mallarmé’s assertion that poetry is an extra extension of language as it bridges the gap between what is desired to be said and the limits of language.